Jul 052012
 
かず:なぶーさん、こんにちは。 なぶ:こんにちは。 かず:しつれいしました、けっこんしていますか? なぶ:すみません、何でいいましたか? Kazu: Hello, Nabu. Nabu: Hello. Kazu: I'm sorry to ask this, but are you married? Nabu: I'm sorry, but what did you say? I think, "I'm sorry. What did you say?" is a very useful phrase.  It is similar to asking someone to repeat what they said.   Read more [...]
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Jun 182012
 
The first phrase I remember learning was: ___ は日本語でなんと言いますか? Of all the phrases I learned, it has proven the most useful.「___は英語でなんと言いますか?」means "How do I say ___ in English?" You can replace the "___" with any word or phrase. Happy learning! Read more [...]
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Jun 172012
 
One of the biggest obstacles to a successful language exchange is fear, the fear of not doing well. I have been involved with Japanese-English language exchanges for the past eight years, and one of my biggest frustrations has been my exchange partners' notions that they were incapable of teaching because they did not have training as teachers. This notion is damaging to the exchange because it results in a lopsided relationship from which only one person receives the positive benefits of instruction. Read more [...]
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Jun 162012
 
Last Thursday, we had our last exchange before summer and before きたーさん returns to the US for five weeks of family vacation time. During the exchange, we made a few long overdue changes. The Thursday exchange is going to become a true exchange. In the past, we have worked on developing relationships with one another and easing our way into the different cultures (social culture) of the groups represented there. For the most part, participants have been either American or Japanese, but Read more [...]
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May 312011
 
This evening, I held an English lesson at the International Center.  My goal was to help my students become more comfortable speaking in English.  So many of them have a great deal of experience and knowledge, and I believe that they are smart enough to become fluent speakers in a year or less. The only thing getting in their way is opportunity, which is what slows down all language learners: they need chances to talk to English speakers.  To help them along, the formal class ends thirty Read more [...]
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